academics, as seen from vegreville. it can be cold here. and it is flat.

Email me

Previous Posts Site Feed

Links

What the hell have I been doing this (academic) year?

  • Manuscripts accepted: 2
  • Manuscripts under review: 1
  • Revise and resubmits to do: 3
  • Working papers: 3
  • New projects: 2
  • Conference presentations: 2
  • Seminars given: 1
  • PhD students in progress: 5
  • PhD students completed: 0
  • Other students supervised: 2
  • Courses taught: 0
  • Courses scheduled: 4
  • Referee reports to write: 2
  • Referee reports completed: 17
  • Committees: 3
  • Angry co-authors: 0
  • Angry students: ?

powered by Blogger

designed by mela and modified by vegreville


Creative Commons License
The contents of this web site are licensed under a Creative Commons License.

Tuesday, January 17, 2006

Not much to add to this

Meetings considered harmful: (from signal vs. noise)
Researchers in organisational psychology have confirmed that meetings are, well, evil. A study conducted by the University of Minnesota found that the amount and length of meetings correlate with “negative effects” (burnout, anxiety, and depression) on its participants.
No surprises here. A few reasons why frequent and long meetings are th3 sucK:
They break your working day into small, incoherent pieces on a schedule incompatible with the natural breaks in your flow
They are normally all about words and abstract concepts, not real things (like a piece of code or a screen of design)
They usually contain an abysmal low amount of information conveyed per minute
They often contain at least one moron that inevitably get his turn to waste everyone’s time with nonsense
They drift off subject easier than a rear-wheel driven Chicago cab in heavy snow
They frequently have agendas so vague nobody is really sure what its about
They require thorough preparation that people rarely do anyway

Please do expand the list.
Here is one reason that the information flow is so low---after you have been meetings with the same people for a while, you can predict with 98% accuracy exactly what everyone will say. Somehow the meeting causes people to 'dig in' to their original positions.

As a rule, the less you say in the meeting, the more that people pay attention to you when you do speak.


link | posted by vegreville at 12:19 PM |


0 Comments:

Want to Post a Comment?